Patients Push Limits for Clues to ME/CFS at NIH

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The NIH study is focusing on people who came down with the disease after an infection, of any sort, within five years. That initial infection is long gone but maybe, the body’s normal reactions to illness went into a destructive tailspin. Nearly 500 patients have called seeking to enroll in NIH’s study that is putting a few dozen under the microscope, with a barrage of sophisticated tests few hospitals can offer under one roof. “The ignorance about the condition just vastly dwarfs what we know about it,” said Dr. Walter Koroshetz, director of NIH’s National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke, which is leading the research.

Source: Patients push limits for clues to chronic fatigue syndrome – STAT

RIKEN (Kobe City) and Osaka City University Hospital Announce a ME/CFS Clinical Drug Trial

In a breakthrough 2014 study in Japan, PET (positron emission tomography) scans of ME/CFS patients brains found significant inflammation in the amygdala, thalamus, and hippocampus that correlated with reduced cognitive function, pain, and depression. So far, PET scans have been performed on 19 male patients (26-54 years old) and 38 females (25-60 years old) of which about 40% have been found to have significant inflammation in the brain. Of these, three men have already started the drug trial. In this clinical trial, a PET scan and various tests are performed before any medication is started. After four months of administration of existing drugs currently used to treat cerebral infarction, various tests will be performed again to see if inflammation and symptoms are relieved. By the end of 2020, a total of 90 patients will be scanned, of which 30 patients with significant inflammation will join the trial. If the drug trial demonstrates positive results, there is the possibility of the development of new drugs to treat ME/CFS symptoms.

Source: Kobe Shimbun NEXT | Medical News | Drug development for severe fatigue and pain (ME/CFS)

Study Finds Differences in Energy Use by Immune Cells in ME/CFS

“This research gives us additional evidence for the role of the immune system in ME/CFS and may provide important clues to help us understand the mechanisms underlying this devastating disease,” said Vicky Whittemore, Ph.D., program director at NIH’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)

Source: Study finds differences in energy use by immune cells in ME/CFS | National Institutes of Health (NIH)

New Study Shows DNA is Held Together by Hydrophobic Forces

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have disproved the prevailing theory of how DNA binds itself. It is not, as is generally believed, hydrogen bonds which bind together the two sides of the DNA structure. Instead, water is the key. The discovery opens doors for new understanding in research in medicine and life sciences. The findings are published in PNAS.

Source: DNA is held together by hydrophobic forces