£3.2m Funding for DecodeME, the Largest Ever ME/CFS DNA Study

Co-Principal Investigator Dr Luis Nacul, CureME Biobank, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, says: “Unlocking the genetic susceptibility to ME/CFS is a key part of understanding what causes ME/CFS and the disease mechanisms involved. This, in conjunction with other biomedical research into ME/CFS, should finally pave the way to better diagnosis and the development of specific treatments for this debilitating disease.”

Source: Patients, scientists and advocates celebrate £3.2m funding for DecodeME, the largest ever ME/CFS DNA study – DecodeME

COVID-19 Can Last for Several Months

On march 17, a day after LeClerc came down with her first symptoms, SARS-CoV-2 sent Fiona Lowenstein to the hospital. Nine days later, after she was discharged, she started a Slack support group for people struggling with the disease. The group, which is affiliated with a wellness organization founded by Lowenstein called Body Politic, has been a haven for long-haulers. One channel for people whose symptoms have lasted longer than 30 days has more than 3,700 members.

Source: Thousands Who Got COVID-19 in March Are Still Sick – The Atlantic

Researchers Warn COVID-19 Could Cause Debilitating Long-term Illness in Some Patients

The long-term illnesses that can follow viral infections can be devastating ⁠— and are devastatingly common. In 2015, the nation’s top medical advisory body, the Institute of Medicine, estimated that between 800,000 and 2.5 million U.S. residents live with the illness or illnesses awkwardly named myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). An estimated three-quarters of these cases were triggered by viral or bacterial infections.

Source: Researchers warn COVID-19 could cause debilitating long-term illness in some patients | The Seattle Times

Will COVID-19 Lead to an Explosion of ME/CFS Cases?

Noting that studies indicated the virus is able to spread throughout the brain including the hypothalamus, Moldofsky proposed the virus had produced a chronic neuroinflammatory state affecting sleep, pain sensitivity and energy levels. That hypothesis, of course, is identical to similar ones proposed for ME/CFS and fibromyalgia.

Source: Will COVID-19 Leave An Explosion of ME/CFS Cases in its Wake? | simmaronresearch.com

The Potential Coronavirus Catastrophe No One is Talking About

The views expressed in this article are purely speculative, there are no known cases currently of ME/CFS being caused by COVID-19.

By not discussing ME as another potential implication of coronavirus, it only adds to the unfolding calamity that the UK, and the planet, could be facing. And moreover, the public needs to be aware of this. Because potentially, for those that get sick with ME after coronavirus, there may be little support available.

Source: The other potential coronavirus catastrophe no one is talking about | The Canary

Early Research on Existing Drug Compounds via Supercomputing Could Combat Coronavirus

Researchers at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have used Summit, the world’s most powerful and smartest supercomputer, to identify 77 small-molecule drug compounds that might warrant further study in the fight against the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, which is responsible for the COVID-19 disease outbreak.

Source: Early research on existing drug compounds via supercomputing could combat coronavirus | ORNL

ME/CFS is Debilitating but Often Dismissed

A study by researchers at DePaul University, published in 2019 in Health Care for Women International, surveyed 541 people with ME/CFS and found that 89% had experienced a dismissive attitude from a healthcare provider. People with the condition often encounter insensitivity, inappropriate beliefs about causes, inappropriate treatments, disbelief and a general lack of knowledge, the study says. Because ME/CFS symptoms overlap with so many other disorders, like depression, those who have the condition are often misdiagnosed.

Source: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Is Debilitating but Often Dismissed

Study: The Prevalence of Pediatric ME

Researchers screened a random sample of 10,119 youth ages 5-17 from 5,622 households. Of those who screened positive over the phone, 165 youth went on to medical and psychiatric examinations. Following evaluations, a team of physicians made final diagnoses. Youth were given a diagnosis of ME/CFS if they met criteria for case definitions. Of the 42 youth diagnosed with ME/CFS, only 2 (4.8%) had been previously diagnosed with the illness.

Source: The Prevalence of Pediatric Myalgic Encephalomyelitis | News | Newsroom | DePaul University, Chicago